Winter birds in East Tennessee: Let’s welcome the snowbirds

Winter is an excellent time to look for birds. Join natural historian Stephen Lyn Bales in a virtual program presented by the University of Tennessee Arboretum Society on Thursday, January 14 at 7:00 p.m.

 

“Let’s Welcome the Snowbirds,” a Zoom presentation, will be an overview of species like dark-eyed junco, hermit thrush, yellow-bellied sapsucker, purple finch, winter wren and many more that overwinter in Tennessee.

 

“The leaves are gone from the trees and they are more visible, plus there are several bird species that are only here in the cold weather months because they migrate from farther north or higher upslope to find food,” explains Bales.

 

Registration for this free online event is required. The format for this program will be Zoom. For the link to register go to:  utarboretumsociety.org. You will be sent a link in your confirmation for program access.

 

To contact Stephen Lyn or buy one of his UT Press books, go to Instagram @stephenlynbales.

 

In accordance with the University of Tennessee guidelines for COVID-19 precautions, programs are currently being presented online.  Though the UT Arboretum Society’s educational programs are not on-site activities, the UT Arboretum Society is pleased to bring the public some great online options.

 

The Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014, is one of ten outdoor laboratories located throughout the state as part of the UT AgResearch system. AgResearch is a division of the UT Institute of Agriculture. The Institute of Agriculture also provides instruction, research and public service through the UT Herbert College of Agriculture, the UT College of Veterinary Medicine, UT AgResearch and UT Extension offices, with locations in every county in the state.

 

To learn more about the Arboretum Society or for questions on this program, go to www.utarboretumsociety.org  or contact mcampani@utk.edu.

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